School newsroom modelled digitally

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Virtual studio . .. George Tabberer (17), a year 13 graphics student at South Otago High School, created a virtual newsroom for his school to use to promote technology awards via the web and TV. PHOTO: JOHN COSGROVE

JOHN.COSGROVE
@cluthaleader.co.nz

In our digital world where news broadcasts are screened or streamed every minute of the day, student George Tabberer decided to create a virtual newsroom for his school’s internal news channel to use.
George (17), a year 13 graphics student at South Otago High School, undertook the challenge as part of his design and visual communications standard.
The result was creating the first of the school’s annual Technology Masters Awards (TMA) broadcasts.
“It is essentially a news broadcast for this year’s awards. It acknowledges the achievements of students here and talks about the latest stuff happening at the school. “To do that I constructed a nice big virtual green screen set which gave the illusion we had a big news desk here at the school, it was movie magic,” he said.
Working with 3-D graphics software, George designed the virtual newsroom, then produced, directed and edited the news video for uploading to Yahoo.
“The idea came from the class teacher, Mr Owen Doherty, he challenged me to create the virtual newsroom, so once I understood the boundaries I had to work in and how creative I could be, I took it on.
“It was fun to build the set and then shoot the broadcast with Mr Doherty in it.
“I’m quite new to it all. I had no experience in Premiere Pro, but by the end, after a bit of frustration, I learnt a lot and eventually figured it all out.”
Over more than a month, he designed the set from draft drawings, then loaded it into the school’s 3-D program and made it appear as real as he could on screen.
“From here, we may be using it in assemblies and in school broadcasts. I will continue to develop it over the school year.”
George hoped to move into the graphics industry.
Head of the SOHS technology department, Owen Doherty, said the TMA is offered once a term to technology students to recognise their achievements, encourage outstanding creative work and support the school values.
“George wanted to increase his skills with the Adobe suite so we challenged him to learn the software and develop the studio, he then produced the whole programme himself.’’