Kids will be kids, whatever the weather delivers

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Lachlan Roy (16) and siblings came up with an inventive transport solution to recent flooding. They pulled out their kayaks to explore the submerged paddocks of their Tuapeka Mouth farm. PHOTO: SUZIE CONROY/SUPPLIED

JACK.CONROY @cluthaleader.co.nz

You may as well get out there and make the most of it.

Clutha youngsters showed just what they are made of during last week’s severe flooding in the South.

As farms and roads were inundated and school openings disrupted, some younger folk were asking themselves how to get around when the backyard was under water.

Lachlan Roy (16) and his siblings came up with an inventive solution.

They pulled out their kayaks to explore the submerged paddocks of their Tuapeka Mouth farm.

Mother Suzie Roy said, “Why not? You may as well get out there and make the most of it.

She said the water was  “half an oar” deep and like nothing the family had seen before while living on their farm.

Just down the road in Clydevale, 5-year-old Montgomery Wilson was supposed to start school on Tuesday last week, but could not as flooding closed Clutha Valley Primary School.

Initially, he was disappointed his first day of school had to be postponed, and said he felt “Sad”.

But that did not last long, as the young explorer decided to make the most of the weather, mother Fiona Wilson said.

“He got out of his school clothes and back into farm clothes pretty quick to go look around.”

The pair also ventured out in the car to look at different flood spots.

On Friday, Montgomery finally got to attend his first day of school, and Mrs Wilson reported he “really enjoyed it”.

But the water enthusiast had not yet, apparently, had enough of the damp stuff.

“His favourite part of the day was swimming lessons in the afternoon.”

School principal Val Ward said the school closed for two days due to the flooding and Waitangi Day added a third day.

The main issue was an inability to get the pupils and teachers to school safely.

“The school  was absolutely fine, but buses couldn’t run because parts of the route were inaccessible,” Mrs Ward said.

“We’ve got really good systems in place when something happens like this.

“It really  put it into practice in the first few days back, which is not normal.”

She said the tight-knit Clutha Valley community was largely responsible for making sure local people and travellers were safe and sound.

“We rely on people in different parts of the community to create ‘ring lists”.